Welcome to the American Civil War Round Table (UK) site

To help you navigate around the site, all articles fall under one of 4 headings: Battles & Campaigns, Preservation, Profiles and UK Heritage.

 

We can now highlight articles on our front page, where we will give priority to forthcoming meetings, events and special announcements.

 

- Webmaster

Our invitation to you

Our Round Table comprises people from all walks of life who are interested in any or all aspects of the war, but who also care enough to contribute to the growing number of initiatives to preserve this heritage for future generations.

 

If after browsing our site you would like to join us we’d be very happy to enrol you, whatever colour you prefer!

Quotation

 

"I confess, without shame, that I am sick and tired of fighting — its glory is all moonshine; even success the most brilliant is over dead and mangled bodies, with the anguish and lamentations of distant families, appealing to me for sons, husbands, and fathers ... it is only those who have never heard a shot, never heard the shriek and groans of the wounded and lacerated ... that cry aloud for more blood, more vengeance, more desolation."

 

(William Tecumseh Sherman)

 

 

The website

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Welcome to the website of the American Civil War Round Table (UK)

American Civil War Round Table UK

We’re a growing group of mostly British-based members, who get together and share information about all aspects of one of the greatest conflicts of the 19th century. You will also find here articles taken from our thrice yearly magazine ‘Crossfire’, that is free to members. If after browsing our site you would like to join us we’d be very happy to enrol you, whatever colour you prefer!

 

Our Round Table comprises people from all walks of life who are interested in any or all aspects of the war, but who also care enough to contribute to the growing number of initiatives to preserve this heritage for future generations. We meet frequently, mostly in London, to hear a wide variety of presentations on the war. Our speakers have included such published historians as Ed Bearss, Amanda Foreman and Gary Gallagher.

 

Why all this interest in American events of the past with so much history of our own? Surprisingly, we are the first in the line of Civil War Round Tables set up in the 1950s - almost exclusively in the United States. We have maintained a natural affinity with events of the Civil War. With many of its participants hailing from these islands it is perhaps not surprising that British viewpoints have been brought to bear on this all-American affair.

 

Forthcoming events

 

Meeting Booking Form

 

Details of how to book for the next meeting

 

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2019 Conference report

 

Here are the details of our recent conference

 

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Meeting Dates 2019

 

26 January Mike Somerville

 

9th March Rod Gragg

 

12th - 14th April - Annual Conference - The War in the Carolinas

 

15th June Rick Hatcher The Ironclad attack on Fort Sumter April 7 1863

 

27th July Joe Whitehorne The Jackson-Loring Controversy,1861-2;The Campaign Jackson Lost

 

14th September Derek Young D H Hill

 

16th November (AGM)

 

TBA - Xmas Lunch - contact Jim Carroll

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

16/6/2019 - NEXT MEETING - The Ironclad Attack on Fort Sumter – April 7, 1863 Rick Hatcher

 

“I have attempted to take the bull by the horns, but he was too much for us.”

 

In our June meeting we continue our conference theme ‘War in the Carolinas’ with a presentation from Richard W. Hatcher, former Park Historian at Fort Sumter.

 

“I have attempted to take the bull by the horns, but he was too much for us.”

 

With these words, Rear Admiral Samuel F. Du Pont confessed to General David Hunter on April 8, 1863 the failure of his attempt to seize Charleston Harbour the previous day. He had assembled a formidable fleet of seven monitors, one ironclad, and an ironclad frigate, totalling 32 heavy guns, to engage the over 70 heavy guns and mortars which held the harbour’s mouth secure. His ships had sailed confidently up the channel and engaged the defences with massive, concentrated fire, and the Confederates had responded with equal firepower. After two and a half hours, DuPont ordered his warships to withdraw. The first ironclad fleet attack in history by U.S. Navy had failed.

Fort Sumter had been struck 57 times during the attack. Damage to its five foot thick walls ranged from 2 inch chips to a crater 10 feet by 8 feet across and 2 feet 6 inches deep. Changes were made to the fort to meet future attacks and over the next year and a half, Sumter, once a grand masonry fort, was transformed into a massive bombproof, nearly impervious to federal shot and shell.

 

SPEAKER’S BIOGRAPHY

 

A native of Richmond, VA, Richard W. Hatcher III is a 1973 graduate of Virginia Commonwealth University where he earned a BA in History. In 1970 Rick began working for the National Park Service (NPS) and has worked at seven NPS units, including four Civil War battlefields. He has been a volunteer, part time, and full time employee as a law enforcement officer, ranger, curator, librarian, and historian. Rick’s last full time assignment began in 1992 as the Historian at Fort Sumter and Fort Moultrie National Historical Park. Though he retired in 2015, Rick has continued his association with the NPS as a volunteer and serves on the Fort Sumter-Fort Moultrie Historical Trust board as chairman of its History Committee.

 

From 1978 Rick has maintained memberships in Civil War Round Tables. He was a member and one term president of the Round Table of the Ozarks and a member of the Charleston Round Table. He is a charter member of the Fort Sumter Civil War Round Table, established in 2019, and is currently its 2nd vice president.

 

He is co-author of The First Shot (2011) on the 1861 bombardment of Fort Sumter, and his two volume history of the fort, Thunder In The Harbor will be published in 2019 by Savas Beatie Press. He is currently working on 100 Significant Civil Photographs of Charleston, also to be published in 2019, by Historical Publications. He is also the co-author of Wilson’s Creek, The Second Major Battle of the Civil War and the Men Who Fought It (2000) and Wilson’s Creek, Pea Ridge, and Prairie Grove (2006).

 

Meetings are held at the Civil Service Club London 1:00pm start

Preservation news

 

Adopt-a-Cannon

 

Our current $500 preservation pledge is for ongoing maintenance for the cannons at Charleston

 

See full article

Crossfire magazine

 

An Officers Pay Slip

 

In Search of Lieutenant George Washington Ward

 

By Charles Priestley

 

 

See full article


 

UK People in the Civil War

 

click image to zoom

by Maurice Rigby

 

Editorial note: This is the first of many (I hope) small vignettes of Britons who played a role in the American Civil War. Contributions are welcome from any source so get digging!

 

Webmaster adds: image is Owen Reynold's photo of Joe Hudson's prize-winning 'Blockade Runner'.

 

Arbuthnot Blain; was a cabinet maker at 35 Paradise Street, Liverpool, and had died at his residence 10, Wheathill Farm, Roby, Huyton, on June 23 1868 aged 72. Born in Donegal about 1796, his firm had furnished the cabins for the Alabama, the fittings and furniture being selected by James Dunwoody Bulloch. The firm of A Blain & son had been established in 1796 by his father, and that his son, William Hughes Blain had now carried on the business around 1864. William was a familiar figure in shipping circles, a portion of which supplied the ships, and the admiralty, with furnishings and upholstery. William Blain passed away at Croft House, Huyton, on February 25th 1909 and was buried in Huyton churchyard.

 

 

 

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Established 1953